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Afghans protest civilian killings by US forces
Afghans protest civilian killings by US forces
Hundreds of Afghans have taken to the streets of the capital Kabul to protest a recent NATO airstrike which killed a number of civilians in the war-ravaged country.
Saturday, December 12,2009 14:58
PRESSTV

Hundreds of Afghans have taken to the streets of the capital Kabul to protest a recent NATO airstrike which killed a number of civilians in the war-ravaged country.

About 300 people marched towards the UN office in Kabul to express their anger.

Similar demonstrations have been held in the cities of Nangarhar and Mehtar Lam.

The air raid which was coordinated between Afghan and foreign forces was carried out over the eastern province of Kunar on Monday.

The rising number of civilian casualties has surged Afghan anger with foreign troops in the country.

The war-torn country is grappling with unprecedented violence, despite the presence of around 110,000 American and other foreign soldiers.

Since the 2001 US-led invasion of Afghanistan, the so-called counter militancy operations have left many thousands of Afghan civilians as well as nearly 800 American troops dead.

The International Committee of the Red Cross says the number of civilian deaths in southern Afghanistan have increased by about 20 percent this year.

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THE SOURCE

tags: Afghans / NATO / Kabul / the Red Cross
Posted in Democracy , Islamic Movements , Human Rights  
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