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Did Al-Qaeda ever matter as much as we think it did?
Did Al-Qaeda ever matter as much as we think it did?
Al-Qaeda's influence isn't as threatening as once believed.
Al-Qaeda was never the threat some thought it was, and others wanted it to be. Al-Qaeda was never going to become mainstream, because other organizations, such as the Muslim Brotherhood, that were strong opponents of al-Qaeda were already quite popular, commanding the loyalty of millions in the region. These were the mainstream, nonviolent Islamists, and it was never coincidental that Ayman al-Zawahiri, al-Qaeda’s no. 2, had written an entire book accusing the Muslim Brotherhood of betraying the Islamic cause by, among other things, participating in elections.
Tuesday, January 5,2010 01:40
by Shadi Hamid Democracy Arsenal

Marc Lynch has a post well worth reading on the Al-Qaeda’s diminishing influence in the Arab world:

The Arab media's indifference to the story speaks to a vitally important trend. Al-Qaeda's attempted acts of terrorism simply no longer carry the kind of persuasive political force with mass Arab or Muslim publics which they may have commanded in the immediate aftermath of 9/11.

It’s not so much that al-Qaeda is irrelevant – it isn’t – but, rather, that it is, and has increasingly become, beside the point. Having lived in Jordan in 2008 and now in Doha, it’s really quite remarkable the extent to which al-Qaeda doesn’t figure into Arab conversations about the future of the Arab world. Except it’s not remarkable.

Al-Qaeda was never the threat some thought it was, and others wanted it to be. Al-Qaeda was never going to become mainstream, because other organizations, such as the Muslim Brotherhood, that were strong opponents of al-Qaeda were already quite popular, commanding the loyalty of millions in the region. These were the mainstream, nonviolent Islamists, and it was never coincidental that Ayman al-Zawahiri, al-Qaeda’s no. 2, had written an entire book accusing the Muslim Brotherhood of betraying the Islamic cause by, among other things, participating in elections.

To be sure, Al-Qaeda had gained sympathy in the years after 9/11, largely due to the perception that they were the only ones actively confronting the United States. But sympathy is different than support, and al-Qaeda could never really claim much of the latter. But then again, it was never al-Qaeda’s objective to gain mass support or become what might be called a membership organization. It’s model has always been different, to use small numbers for big effect, and, in this, there is little doubt they had succeeded, at least for a time.

What people seem to forget is that al-Qaeda wasn’t influential for what it was – or perhaps even for what it did – but, rather, for how others reacted to it, namely the Bush administration.


 

tags: Moderate / Engage / The Arab Media / Al-Qaeda / Moderate Muslim Brotherhood / Moderate Islamist / Acts Of Terrorism / Qaeda / Qaida
Posted in MB VS. Qaeda  
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The orgin of Al- Qaeda Abdulfattah
Mushims do not seem to have learned to stop reacting to the western media and the US government because thay still think that there is an orginization called Al- Qaeda. Al-Qaeda was created by the CIA knowing that Muslims would run to Afganistan to fight the Russians. To prove this all anyone has to do is to look up the following two people. First,Michael Speringmann, former head US Consular Offical, Jedda, Saudi Arabia form 1987to 1989. He has a web site and is on You Tube. Second, find Sibel Edmands who was a translator for the FBI. After reading about these two people, tell me that there is an orginization called Al Qaeda. If there is it is in Langly Va., USA.
Saturday, January 9,2010 00:09
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