Chairman of the Cairo Criminal Court accuses US of meddling in Egyptian internal affairs

Chairman of the Cairo Criminal Court accuses US of meddling in Egyptian internal affairs

 Mohammadi Qunsou, the presiding judge at the criminal court in Cairo, accused the United States of intervening in the internal affairs of Egypt. Qunsou stated in his argument that the defense counsel for the eleven defendants standing trial for the trafficking of newborn children during the hearing counted on the  report from the U.S. State Department claiming that this case is not as important as the media makes it out to be in Egypt, or even to be considered by the court. The Egyptian judiciary is an impartial judiciary, neither afraid of the Americans nor anybody else, he argued.
 
Wednesday evening”s hearing continued for approximately seven hours, during which the court heard testimonies from both the Public Prosecution and defendants. The Prosecution emphasized the accusations indicted against those who were involved in the trafficking of newborn children for illegal adoption is prohibited in Islamic Law and violates human rights. The defendants formed an inter-continental organized gang involving the trafficking of human beings  and specializing in the selling of newborn babies.
 
The heinous crime goes against all international norms and charters. The court confirmed that adoption is prohibited by law in Egypt, according to articles 30, 40, 41, 42, 213, 214, 215, 217, 283 and 291 of the Penal Code, and Articles 4 and 116 of Act No. 12 of 96 on childhood and was amended by Law 126 of 2008. The prosecution demands harsh punishment for the suspects, hoping to set an example in an effort to protect the future of the children in Egypt.
 
Details of the case started in Qasr Al-Nil court, when the accused, Susan, went to the U.S. embassy in Cairo requesting to include the custody of the two-month-old infant Marco on her US passport.  The embassy doubted that she entered Egypt four months ago, as the rules and regulations of US airlines do not allow women who are four months pregnant or more to travel. Furthermore, the child proved to be only two months old at the time.