Students, Opposition, and International Groups Condemn Church Bombing
Students, Opposition, and International Groups Condemn Church Bombing
Monday, January 3,2011 20:27

 The deadly blast outside an Egyptian Church in Alexandria was condemned by representatives from Egypt's entire political spectrum, governments worldwide and international organizations. The attack which left 26 dead and close to 100 injured has been blamed on foreign entities while Al-Qaida has claimed responsibility.

Opposition groups and protestors  blamed the government for its inability to protect its people and provide enough security stressing that its 3 decade emergency law failed to live up to its alleged purpose.

 The attack prompted opposition groups to collaborate and form a national committee to promote civil rights.  Leaders from the Muslim Brotherhood, Al-Wafd Party, Al-Ghad, Al-Tagammu, Al-Gabha Party, Al-Wasat Party and the Kefaya Movement for Change met at Al-Wafd's headquarters on Saturday to declare a united stand against the attack.
 
Clashes broke out where nearly 1000 people marched in Alexandria in protest of the attack while other protests in Cairo and Assuit emerged.  A number of activists and journalists were detained by security forces as they were attempting to merge the new protest groups with previously planned protests, leading to clashes and violence.   Rocks were thrown and people were beaten with crosses, stones, and sticks.
 
Four thousand Coptic garbage collectors engaged in a violent strike on the Autostrad highway, throwing stones and empty bottles on the street protesting to the explosive incident.
The Muslim Brotherhood were among the first to denounce the attacks and renew claims that Islam explicitly forbids  acts of terrorism and affirm their denouncement of the actions of whomever is responsible.  Egypt’s University students and teachers at Ain Shams and Helwan marched in protest.

Nationwide requests urged the significance of a solid, unified response to the terrorist attacks

 

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