• September 19, 2007

U.S. Democracy Promotion During and After Bush

U.S. Democracy Promotion During and After Bush

Despite sweeping rhetoric about the global spread of democracy, the Bush Administration has significantly damaged U.S. democracy promotion efforts and increased the number of close ties with “friendly tyrants,” concludes a new report from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Security interests, such as the war on terrorism, and U.S. energy needs have led the Bush Administration to maintain friendly, unchallenged relations with more than half of the 45 “non-free” countries in the world.

On September 12, Thomas Carothers presented the findings of his new report, U.S. Democracy Promotion During and After Bush. Two distinguished guests, Francis Fukuyama and Vin Weber, commented on his presentation, followed by a question-and-answer session.

Event transcript posted to the right.


Presenter
Thomas Carothers, Vice President for Studies, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Commentators
Francis Fukuyama, Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy, Johns Hopkins University
The Honorable Vin Weber, Chairman, National Endowment for Democracy

Moderator
Jennifer Windsor, Executive Director, Freedom House

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Windsor Introduction by Jennifer Windsor

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Carothers Remarks by Thomas Carothers

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Weber Remarks by Vin Weber

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fukuyama Remarks by Francis Fukuyama

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Discussion Question and Answer Session

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Event Transcript (PDF)— not checked against delivery


 


“this commentary is reprinted with permission from the Arab Reform Bulletin. Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.”